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Sunday, November 18, 2012

HOW TO TEACH SCIENCE.

                                                    THE FACTS BEHIND LEARNING SCIENCE
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Elementary schools in Kansas and four surrounding states have drastically reduced or even eliminated instruction in scien...ce because teachers feel pressured to improve performance in math and reading, according to a survey conducted by a Kansas school superintendent.


George Griffith, superintendent of the Trego school district and a member of a Kansas committee drawing up new national science standards, told the Kansas Board of Education on Tuesday that he surveyed more than 900 elementary teachers in Kansas, Colorado, Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska as part of a doctoral dissertation.His survey found as many as one in five elementary teachers in the states are reporting science grades on student report cards, even though they don't teach the subject or test pupils in it, The Lawrence Journal-World reported (http://bit.ly/ZsspOV ). The teachers said pressure to increase performance on reading and math tests prompted them reduce class time for science.

"I identified that a little over 55 percent of our K-6 teachers have decreased science education," Griffith said. "The average was between 30 minutes to an hour per week that they have cut it, with the main reason that they want to focus on reading and math assessments."

Read more: http://www.seattlepi.com/news/article/Report-Science-reduced-in-Kan-elementary-schools-4036406.php#ixzz2CdVGfxd5



.Times are changing. But in elementary school very little science is taught. We tend to isolate teaching depending how the scores look. We have hurt the student because we do not teach the whole child. Get back to problem solving and teaching the whole child and away from isolation teaching of subjects.


Study: It isn't teacher, it's method that matters

www.azcentral.com

Study: It isn't teacher, it's method that matters , A study by a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, now a science adviser to President Barack Obama, suggests that how you teach is more important than who does the teaching.

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