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Monday, April 20, 2009

EARTHWORMS















EARTHWORMS RUNNING A MUCK IN THE CLASSROOM
By: Jordynn Casetta 4th period

WORM FACTS

An earthworm can grow only so long. The size of a well-fed adult will depend on what kind of worm it is, how many segments it has, and how old it is. An Lumbricus terrestris will be from 90-300 millimeters long. A worm has no arms, legs or eyes. There are approximately 2,700 different kinds of earthworms. Worms live where there is food, moisture, oxygen and a favorable temperature. If they don’t have these things, they go somewhere else. In one acre of land, there can be more than a million earthworms. The largest earthworm ever found was in South Africa and measured 22 feet from its nose to the tip of its tail. Worms tunnel deeply in the soil and bring subsoil closer to the surface mixing it with the topsoil. Slime, a secretion of earthworms, contains nitrogen. Nitrogen is an important nutrient for plants. The sticky slime helps to hold clusters of soil particles together in formations called aggregates. Charles Darwin spent 39 years studying
earthworms more than 100 years ago. Worms are cold-blooded animals.Earthworms have the ability to replace or replicate lost segments. This ability varies greatly depending on the species of worm you have, the amount of damage to the worm and where it is cut. It may be easy for a worm to replace a lost tail, but may be very difficult or impossible to replace a lost head if things are not just right.Baby worms are not born. They hatch from cocoons smaller than a grain of rice. The Australian Gippsland Earthworm grows to 12 feet long and can weigh 1-1/2 pounds. Even though worms don’t have eyes, they can sense light, especially at their anterior (front end). They move away from light and will become paralyzed if exposed to light for too long (approximately one hour). If a worm’s skin dries out, it will die. Worms are hermaphrodites. Each worm has both male and female organs. Worms mate by joining their clitella (swollen area near the head of a mature
worm) and exchanging sperm. Then each worm forms an egg capsule in its clitellum. Worms can eat their weight each day.

Friday, April 17, 2009

Corn Snakes

By: Gem Confer
Corn snakes, also known as red rat snakes, are a large, powerful, and non-venomous constrictor in the genus Elaphe. Corn snakes feed on rodents and other small prey. In fact corn snakes got their name both from the pattern on their belly, which looks like Indian corn, and from old southern farmers who stored their harvested corn in wooden buildings called cribs. The average adult corn snake will grow to be about 3 to 5 ft. long in a period of about four years. However they are always growing. The longest corn snake on record was 6 ft. long. Corn snakes are very shy, and usually most active at night, however this varies with temperature. During the day they often hide under loose tree bark, beneath logs, rocks, and in rodent burrows where they search for their prey. Corn snakes swallow their food whole, usually beginning with the head. Their list of prey items include most any small lizard, rodent, or bird and their eggs, that are the same diameter, or close to the same diameter as the snake's body. Adult corn snake will predominantly feed on rodents; however, on occasion, they will take a bird or a bird's egg. . One end of the enclosure should be warm (80 to 85°F [26.7 to 29°C]), and the other end at close to room temperature. You may feed a corn snake twice a week, depending on the prey's size, but once a week is usually enough. Most reptiles and amphibians found in the pet trade can be easily converted to feeding on killed prey. Signs of a bacterial infection or endoparasites are listlessness, failure to eat over several weeks, or regurgitation of meals. Left untreated, infestations can not only kill your snake, but can even be transmitted to humans. Collect the feces or vomit in a clean plastic bag, and seal it. Label it with your name, phone number, date, and your snake's name. It is best to have these tests done by an experienced reptile vet.



Part 2
The Adventure Continues
Baby Corn Snakes can be kept for quite some time in a 10 gallon fish tank. One adult should have a 30 gallon tank or larger. Bigger is always better! Obviously multiple adults need a far larger cage. They need a heating pad at one end of the tank so they can move back and forth adjusting their body temperature. There are under tank heaters that can be purchased at most pet stores. The tank must have a locking screen top. This is very important. Most pet stores sell clips that lock the top down securely. Buying 4 clips will ensure that you won't be doing any "snake hunting" around the house. People will tell you to just stack books on top, but beware, snakes are escape artists that can wriggle through a very small hole. Corn Snakes need a bowl of fresh water at all times, preferably large enough for them to submerge their whole body in. They like to soak themselves quite frequently. They do not need any special lighting like most lizards do. They need to be fed once per week as babies (frozen, thawed mice are best) but as they get larger they can be fed every 2 or 3 weeks. Obesity can be a problem since they don't get the exercise that their wild counterparts get. Yes, they only eat mice and or small rats. There is no substitute. So, if you are squeamish about that, maybe a snake isn't for you! Speaking of exercise, letting your snake out for some exercise on a regular basis is a very good idea. When they are small they can just come out and wind around your fingers and arms. When they get bigger they can cruise all over your body or they can be let go on the floor under close supervision. Baby Corn Snakes tame down VERY quickly. All it takes is some daily handling for about a week and they become very "friendly". An adult that hasn't been handled much will tame down also although maybe not so fast. Babies may nip at you at first but that should end quickly. It doesn't hurt much anyway. When picking up a Corn Snake you want to be gentle but firm. A small snake or a baby can be picked up with one hand. A larger one needs to be supported with both hands. Don't just pick up an adult by either end while letting the other end dangle. If the snake feels unsupported it might thrash around and injure itself. Let a baby Corn Snake slither through your fingers, back and forth between your hands. Just keep letting him crawl around. He may be fast at first but once he figures out that you don't want to hurt him or eat him he will calm down. Corn Snakes don't calm down as much as the Pythons or Boas. It is just their nature to be more active. Don't expect to be able to walk around the house with your adult Corn Snake wrapped around your neck. It is more likely that he will be crawling all over the place and attempting to wrap around anything you walk near.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Invention Convention 15 Days Away!!!



The inventions from the students were very successful. I was very impressed with all of the time and effort that the students put into their individual inventions. For all of those students who are planning on submitting their inventions to the "Invention Convention" they should be putting the finishing touches on their inventions. As the year moves is quickly winding down the students can look forward to a unit on animals (they will each have a pet) and finishing the school year with a unit on earthquakes. Below you will find pictures of all of the inventions and videos of students presenting their inventions.










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2K9 Faucett





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Life Made Easier!





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Invention Convention III





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Solving Your White Board Problems!







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The Amazing Dog Fetcher!





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Invention Convention II

Solar Fan Hat!

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Invention Convention Slideshow!!!

(MYTHBUSTERS) How Many Times Can You Fold A Piece of Paper???

Friday, April 3, 2009

Future Engineers of the World (Part 3)

Mr. Iannone's homeroom is almost done with building the carnival rides. At the "Invention Convention," Mr. Iannone will have a number of students talking about the Knex's they built, animals in the classroom( Moose, Harry, Peaches, Sponge Bob, and Crystal), and their inventions. The studnets have been working hard on their inventions and they look forward to showing them off April 30th. In this video the ever so busy Theresa Chappell, Jake Pitts, and Victoria Vincent take the time to talk to our field correspondent about their work. The students talk about what they have learned and what challenges they faced along the uphill battle (no pun intended).



The future engineers @ Six Flags, Disney Land/Disney World, & Water World.

Turantulas


Tarantulas are a group of hairy and often very large spiders belonging to the family Theraphosidae, in this group 900 species have been identified. Some Tarantulas hunt prey primarily in trees and others hunt on or near the ground. All tarantulas can produce silk; but some species will typically reside in a silken "tube tent", terrestrial species will line their burrows with silk to stabilize the burrow wall and facilitate climbing up and down. Tarantulas mainly eat insects and other arthropods, using ambush as their primary method of prey capture. The biggest tarantulas can kill animals as large as lizards, mice, and birds. Tarantulas are found in tropical and desert regions around the world. Most tarantulas are harmless to humans, and some species are popular in the exotic pet trade. Some species (not known to have ever produced human fatalities) have venom that can produce extreme discomfort over a period of several days. The name tarantula comes from the town of Taranto in Southern Italy and was originally used for an unrelated species of European wolf spider. The name was borrowed to apply to the Theraphosids when Europeans explored areas where these large spiders were common. In Africa, Theraphosids are frequently referred to as "baboon spiders". Asian forms are known as "earth tigers" or "bird eating spiders". Australians refer to their species as "barking spiders", "whistling spiders", or "bird spiders". People in other parts of the world also apply the general name "mygales" to Theraphosid spiders.

INVENTION CONVENTION




strong>INVENTION CONVENTION


The students were involved with designing their own personal Invention. The goal of this project was to harness the creative potentional of 6th graders while also following the State of Arizona's technology educational objective. The students learned about other inventors and also designed their own Invention. Students used the skills they have learned through this year to develop their own Invention. The skills involed were critical thinking and problem solving. Following are some of the Inventions the students designed and some of their comments about the project.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Future Engineers of Tomorrow (Part 2)

Victoria and Teresa built another addition to the in your face and hands on science classroom of Mr. Iannone. The two future engineers talk about what they have learned and what struggles they had to overcome along the way.



Victoria and Teresa explain the sweat, tears, and muscle that went into the ferris wheel.

Future Engineers of Tomorrow! (Part 1)

In the students free time they have had the opportunity to build various rides you would see at the fair. The students needed to overcome challenges and improvise in order to complete tasks in a timely manner. The students enjoyed building the Knex even though they had the look of defeat and frustration at the end of many days. The following is a quick interview with a few of our future engineers that will shape the world.



Austin, Diego & (Jason missing)

STUDENT'S VIEW OF SCHOOL





AUTHOR IS NIKITA BHUYAN

MR IANNONE AND MR LANE

MR IANNONE AND MR LANE ARE BOTH INTELLIGENT AND SMART. EVERY DAY THEY MAKE A STUDENT LAUGH, SMILE OR GIGGLE. IF ANYBODY IS HAVING A BAD DAY, THEY ARE THERE TO CHEER THEM UP IN AMY WAY. IN CLASS, THEY ALWAYS HAVE ENJOYABLE WAYS OF TEACHING SO THAT IT BECOMES EASY FOR US TO FOLLOW AND MEMORIZE. MR. IANNONE AND MR. LANE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO ARE CLEAR AND GET TO THE POINT FAST. WHEN WE HAVE QUESTIONS OR ANY DOUBT ON THE SUBJECT, THEY HELP US GETTING IT THROUGH EASILY. SINCE THEY KEEP US HAPPY, SO WE WILL KEEP THEM HAPPY.

THANK YOU FOR BEING SUCH GOOD TEACHER FOR US.